david wong

Hey! I'm David, a security consultant at Cryptography Services, the crypto team of NCC Group . This is my blog about cryptography and security and other related topics that I find interesting.

Common x509 certificate validation/creation pitfalls

posted September 2016

I wrote a gist here on certificate validation/creation pitfalls. I don't know if it is up for release but I figured I would get more input, and things to add to it, if I would just released it. So, go check it out and give me your feedback here!

Here's a copy of the current version:

Certificate validation/creation pitfalls

A x509 certificate, and in particular the latest version 3, is the standard for authentication in Public Key Infrastructures (PKIs). Think about Google proving that he's Google before you can communicate with him.

So. Heh. This x509 thing is a tad complicated. Trying to parse such a thing usually end up in the creation of a lot of different vulnerabilities. I won't talk about that here. I will talk about the other complicated thing about them: using them correctly!

So here's a list of pitfalls in the creation of such certificates, but also in the validation and use of them when encountering them in the wild wild web (or in your favorite infrastructure).

  1. KeyUsage
  2. Validity Dates
  3. Critical Extensions
  4. Hostname Validation
  5. Basic Constraints
  6. Name Constraint

KeyUsage

explanation: keyUsage is a field inside a x509 v3 certificate that limits the power of the public key inside the certificate. Can you only use it to sign? Or can it be used as part of a key Exchange as well (ECDH)? etc...

relevant RFC: Internet X.509 Public Key Infrastructure Certificate and Certificate Revocation List (CRL) Profile

relevant ASN.1:

KeyUsage ::= BIT STRING {
           digitalSignature        (0),
           nonRepudiation          (1),
           keyEncipherment         (2),
           dataEncipherment        (3),
           keyAgreement            (4),
           keyCertSign             (5),
           cRLSign                 (6),
           encipherOnly            (7),
           decipherOnly            (8) }

seen in attacks: KCI

best practice: Specify the KeyUsage at creation, verify the keyUsage when encountering the certificate. keyCertSign should be used if the certificate is a CA, keyAgreement should be used if a key exchange can be done with the public key of the certificate.

see more: Extended Key Usage

Validity Dates

explanation: a certificate is only to be valid in a specific interval of time. This interval is specified by the notBefore and notAfter fields.

relevant RFC: Internet X.509 Public Key Infrastructure Certificate and Certificate Revocation List (CRL) Profile

relevant ASN.1:

Validity ::= SEQUENCE {
    notBefore      Time,
    notAfter       Time }

best practice: Reject certificates that have a notBefore date posterior to the current date, or that have a notAfter date anterior to the current date.

Critical extensions

explanation: x509 certificate is an evolving standard, exactly like TLS, through extensions. To preserve backward compatibility, not being able to parse an extension is often considered OK, that is unless the extension is considered critical (important).

relevant RFC: https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc5280#section-4.2

relevant ASN.1:

Extension  ::=  SEQUENCE  {
    extnID      OBJECT IDENTIFIER,
    critical    BOOLEAN DEFAULT FALSE,
    extnValue   OCTET STRING
                -- contains the DER encoding of an ASN.1 value
                -- corresponding to the extension type identified
                -- by extnID
}

best practice: at creation mark every important extensions as critical. At verification make sure to process every critical extensions. If a critical extension is not recognized, the certificate MUST be rejected.

Hostname Validation

explanation:

Knowing who you're talking to is really important. A x509 certificate is tied to a specific domain/organization/email/... if you don't check who it is tied to, you are prone to impersonation attacks. Because of reasons, these things can be seen in different places in the subject field or in the Subject Alternative Name (SAN) extension. For TLS, things are standardized differently and it will always need to be checked in the latter field.

This is one of the trickier issues in this list as hostname validation is protocol specific (as you can see TLS does things differently) and left to the application. To quote OpenSSL:

One common mistake made by users of OpenSSL is to assume that OpenSSL will validate the hostname in the server's certificate

relevant RFC:

relevant ASN.1:

TBSCertificate  ::=  SEQUENCE  {
    version         [0]  EXPLICIT Version DEFAULT v1,
    serialNumber         CertificateSerialNumber,
    signature            AlgorithmIdentifier,
    issuer               Name,
    validity             Validity,
    subject              Name,

seen in attacks:

best practice: During creation, check for the subject as well as the subject alternative name fields. During verification, check that the leaf certificate matches the domain/person you are talking to. If TLS is the protocol being used, check that in the subject alternative name field, only one level of wildcard is allowed and it must be on the leftmost position (*.domain.com is allowed, sub.*.domain.com is forbidden). Consult RFC 6125 for more information.

see more:

Basic Constraints

explanation: the BasicConstraints extension dictates if a certificate is a CA (can sign others) or not. If it is, it also says how many CAs can follow it before a leaf certificate.

relevant RFC: https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc5280#section-4.2.1.9

relevant ASN.1:

id-ce-basicConstraints OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::=  { id-ce 19 }

BasicConstraints ::= SEQUENCE {
    cA                      BOOLEAN DEFAULT FALSE,
    pathLenConstraint       INTEGER (0..MAX) OPTIONAL }

seen in attacks: Moxie - New Tricks For Defeating SSL In Practice (2009)

best practice: set this field to the relevant value when creating a certificate. When validating a certificate chain, make sure that the pathLen is valid and the cA field is set to TRUE for each non-leaf certificate.

Name Constraints

explanation: the NameConstraints extension contains a set of limitations for CA certificates, on what kind of certificates can follow them in the chain.

relevant RFC: https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc5280#section-4.2.1.10

relevant ASN.1:

id-ce-nameConstraints OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::=  { id-ce 30 }

NameConstraints ::= SEQUENCE {
     permittedSubtrees       [0]     GeneralSubtrees OPTIONAL,
     excludedSubtrees        [1]     GeneralSubtrees OPTIONAL }

GeneralSubtrees ::= SEQUENCE SIZE (1..MAX) OF GeneralSubtree

GeneralSubtree ::= SEQUENCE {
     base                    GeneralName,
     minimum         [0]     BaseDistance DEFAULT 0,
     maximum         [1]     BaseDistance OPTIONAL }

BaseDistance ::= INTEGER (0..MAX)

best practice: when creating a CA certificate, be aware of the constraints chained certificates should have and document it in the NameConstraints field. When verifying a CA certificate, verify that each certificate in the certificate chain is valid according to the requirements of upper certificates.

Out of scope

  • Certificate Chain Validation
  • Certificate Revocation

Acknowledgements

Thanks to Chris Palmer, Vincent Lynch and Jeff Jarmoc

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